Nystagmus Network runners to be part of world’s first 100,000 person marathon


50,000 runners to take on world’s biggest virtual marathon on Sunday 3 October with 50,000 runners to tackle the traditional London Marathon route on the same day With the results of the 2021 Virgin Money London Marathon Ballot announced recently, the Nystagmus Network has 3 places for anyone who wants to raise crucial funds while … Continue reading Nystagmus Network runners to be part of world’s first 100,000 person marathon

Congratulations, Dr Thomas


The Nystagmus Network is sending huge congratulations to the newly qualified Dr Nikita Thomas. Dr Thomas achieved her PhD this month. Nikita is well known to members of the Nystagmus Network for her engaging personality and confident presentations on her latest nystagmus research. On World Sight Day 2020, Nikita was named an Eye Health Hero … Continue reading Congratulations, Dr Thomas

Sam’s challenge of a lifetime


Nystagmus Network Trustee, Sam Jones will be cycling 500 miles around the North Coast of Scotland in June this year to raise money for the Nystagmus Network. It’s the ultimate road trip and the challenge of a lifetime. What people may not realise is that Sam has nystagmus himself and is acually the reason the … Continue reading Sam’s challenge of a lifetime

Nystagmus does cause visual crowding – it’s official


It’s long been understood that people with nystagmus can struggle to pick out objects from an image or face in a crowd. That’s a phenomenon called visual crowding. But how does nystagmus cause this? Now Vijay, Taylor, nystagmus researcher at London’s Moorfields Eye Hospital and University College London has shown that the eye movements associated … Continue reading Nystagmus does cause visual crowding – it’s official

Thank you, Zoe


It’s fitting that our final nystagmus hero of 2020 is someone who has been working tirelessly all year looking after some of our most vulnerable people. Zoe is a care supervisor and head house keeper in a care home, working over 40 hours a week. She was born with nystagmus and optic atrophy. She struggles … Continue reading Thank you, Zoe

Thank you, Nikita


On World Sight Day 2020, Nikita was named an Eye Health Hero by the IAPB (the International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness). Nominated for her innovative work in perimetry, we’re sure that Nikita has a brilliant nystagmus research career ahead of her. And now we’re not the only ones to think so. You can … Continue reading Thank you, Nikita

Thank you, Nadine


Thanks to her book ‘Can I tell you about nystagmus?’, children and their parents feel better able to explain nystagmus to others. In 2020, with the country in lockdown and schools closed, Nadine came up trumps again with advice and tips for parents struggling with homeschooling. Most importantly of all, Nadine allowed us to let … Continue reading Thank you, Nadine

Thank you, Mike


What can we say about Mike that hasn’t been said already? He endured so much for the nystagmus cause this year – including very wet feet, a constantly rumbling tummy and often only the company of chickens! But Mike still walked 3000 miles to raise £2,500 for the Nystagmus Network. A-m-a-z-i-n-g! And after all that … Continue reading Thank you, Mike

Thank you, Mervyn


Nystagmus can be challenging to diagnose in children and often the level of sight loss a newly diagnosed child will experience is unclear, leading to significant anxiety for parents who fear their child will develop severe visual impairment. Thanks to the work of Dr Melvyn Thomas and the research team at the University of Leicester … Continue reading Thank you, Mervyn

Thank you, Libby


Inspired by her 2 younger sisters, who both have nystagmus, final year geography student, Libby chose to explore the experiences of young visually impaired adults in their local space and environment  and the impacts on identity formation for her dissertation. You can read more about Libby’s research here: https://nystagmusnetwork.org/can-you-help-libby-with-her-research/ Thank you for being a great ‘big … Continue reading Thank you, Libby